100 percent of Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s donations went to Democrats

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is the most partisan agency in the federal government in terms of donations to candidates, according to campaign finance data.

Employees at the CFPB, which was created by the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, contributed nearly $50,000 during the 2016 campaign with all of that money going to aid Hillary Clinton or her rival, the insurgent socialist Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt. Agency employees made more than 300 donations during the campaign. Not one went to a Republican candidate.

Rep. Sean Duffy, R-Wisc., a frequent critic of the agency, said that it is no surprise that the agency would contribute to the Democratic campaign. Republicans have tried to reduce the scope of the bureau’s broad regulatory power since Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., one of the most liberal lawmakers in the country, oversaw its creation.

“CFPB employees fell over each other to give money to Hillary because she supported CFPB’s desire to remain in the shadows and unaccountable to the American people,” Duffy said. “No one is shocked that Washington bureaucrats would donate to the candidate who promised to maintain and expand onerous Dodd-Frank regulations that crush our community banks and local credit unions.”

The bureau did not return request for comment from the Washington Free Beacon about the donations.

The CFPB was one of just four agencies in which every political contribution went to the Democratic Party or allied groups, though one of those agencies’ donations came from just one employee.

Peace Corps workers contributed nearly $25,000 to Hillary Clinton and her allies, including the pro-abortion Emily’s List PAC, the second highest total of monolithic agency contributions.

Click for more from The Washington Free Beacon. 

http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2016/11/24/100-percent-cfpb-donations-went-to-democrats.html

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VOC News

10/20/16 3:30 pm CDT

AUSTIN, Texas–(BUSINESS WIRE)–VOC Energy Trust (NYSE: VOC) announced the Trust distribution of net

profits for the third quarterly payment period ended September 30, 2016.

Unitholders of record on October 31, 2016 will receive a distribution

amounting to $1,700,000 or $0.10 per unit, payable November 14, 2016.

Volumes, average sales prices and net profits for the payment period

were:

Sales volumesmore…

7/20/16 3:00 pm CDT

AUSTIN, Texas–(BUSINESS WIRE)–VOC Energy Trust (NYSE: VOC) announced the Trust distribution of net

profits for the second quarterly payment period ended June 30, 2016.

Unitholders of record on August 1, 2016 will receive a distribution

amounting to $1,530,000 or $0.09 per unit, payable August 12, 2016.

Volumes, average sales prices and net profits for the payment period

weremore…

Distribution History

Declaredsort icon

Record

Payable

Amount

1/15/15

1/30/15

2/14/15

0.1 USD

10/16/14

10/30/14

11/14/14

0.37 USD

7/17/14

7/30/14

8/14/14

0.39 USD

4/17/14

4/30/14

5/15/14

0.52 USD

1/16/14

1/30/14

2/14/14

0.57 USD

10/17/13

10/30/13

11/14/13

0.53 USD

7/18/13

7/30/13

8/14/13

0.41 USD

4/18/13

4/30/13

5/15/13

0.48 USD

1/17/13

1/30/13

2/14/13

0.26 USD

10/18/12

10/30/12

11/14/12

0.46 USD

http://voc.investorhq.businesswire.com/

‘Neighbors’ Sequel In The Works With Seth Rogen And Zac Efron

Seth Rogen and Zac Efron will team up again for a sequel to “Neighbors,” last summer’s blockbuster comedy from Universal. Rose Byrne will also return to play Rogen’s wife and director Nicholas Stoller is on board, The Hollywood Reporter first reported.

Andrew Jay Cohen and Brendan O’Brien wrote the first movie, which followed Rogen and Bryne as new parents who move next to a fraternity house run by bros (Efron and Dave Franco). Cohen and O’Brien will be back for the sequel, tentatively titled “Neighbors 2.” The Hollywood Reporter reports that in the sequel a rowdy sorority moves next door to the couple, and they’ll have to ask their former enemies for help.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/02/06/neighbors-sequel_n_6632016.html

Two Pennsylvania Men Try to Commit Suicide, One Survives

Two men turned to the Internet when they wanted to end their lives this week. They didn’t know each other, but both were in their 20s, both lived in Pennsylvania and both had mothers who paid a price in the end.

Only one of the men survived.

On Sunday morning, a Whitehall man in his 20s created a concoction of toilet bowl cleaner, shampoo and other household chemicals to create a fatally toxic gas, Whitehall Fire Department Chief Robert Benner told ABCNews.com. The man, whom police did not identify, then closed himself in his mother’s garage and waited to die.

“It’s unfortunate that they have to put it [suicide instructions] on the Internet,” Brenner said. “People who have perhaps a mental problem see this stuff and try to end it all and make trouble for the people who have to get rid of it.”

Beforehand, the Whitehall man posted a sign to warn first responders and family members of the poisonous gas — instructions straight from Internet websites that teach life-weary web surfers how to mix the chemicals.

But the man did something wrong. Without enough sulfur, the mixture that should have killed him in seconds wasn’t working. He called 911 to save himself.

The man survived and voluntarily committed himself to a 72-hour hospital program, Brenner said.

His mother was left with the cleanup bill, which totaled several thousand dollars, Brenner said, adding that crews initially refused to contain the toxic waste because the woman’s credit card was almost maxed out.

About 36 hours later, another mother about 70 miles away nearly paid the price for her son’s suicide with something she can’t charge to a credit card: her life.

State police say a 28-year-old man in Delaware County mixed his own chemicals on Monday afternoon and zipped himself into a tent.

Police would not say whether this man posted a sign outside the tent, but his mother didn’t heed the warning if he did. She was trying to save her son, when chemical fumes overcame her, police said.

She was hospitalized, treated and released, but her son died from breathing in his homemade poison.

Medical professionals think household chemical suicides have become more prevalent in the United States since first cropping up in 2008, according to Dr. Nadine Kaslow, the chief psychologist at Emory University Medical School’s department of psychiatry and behavioral sciences.

“And the numbers just keep going up all the time,” she said. “There’s sort of a sense that there’s this chemical suicide phenomenon.”

Around the time medical professionals and law enforcement started seeing chemical suicides in the United States, 208 of them were reported in Japan during a three-month period in 2008, according to a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report. Researchers said they thought the spike was a result of instructions posted on the Internet.

Kaslow said she isn’t sure why chemical suicides have become more common in the United States since then, but agreed the Internet is playing a role.

“There’s a growing amount of information on what to do and the top household chemicals to kill yourself,” she said.

The CDC did its own study, examining chemical suicides attempted in cars from 2006 to 2010 in 15 states. It found 10 suicides matching the criteria, and noted that 85 surrounding people had to be evacuated and 32 had to be decontaminated. Four officers were injured responding to the suicides.

Klaslow said chemical suicides aren’t always attempted in cars, but first responders need to be careful because some chemical recipes produce colorless, odorless gases. Even giving mouth-to-mouth resuscitation could be deadly, she said.

“You don’t want the first responders to have to inhale the fumes,” she said.

http://abcnews.go.com/US/pennsylvania-men-commit-suicide-survives/story?id=16706716

Household Products … or Hidden Cameras

At first glance, they look like any other household product that would blend right in on almost any kitchen counter. A box of Pringles potato chips. A canister of Slim Jims. A tub of OxiClean.

But, take a closer look.

Closer. Now, even closer. If you get close enough and squint your eyes, you may notice that there’s a little black dot on the packaging that looks slightly out of place. If you look even closer, you see that the black dot is actually a tiny hole.

On the Pringles container, the hole is hidden in the number 5 at the top of the can where it says “25% More!” If you study the plastic Clorox wipes container, you’ll find it in a small blue box amid the writing “cleans & disinfects!” And, if you look closely in between the x and the i on the OxiClean stain-remover label, there it is! That tiny hole again.

But, these are not normal everyday household products with tiny holes in them.

They are hidden cameras manufactured by Florida-based Safety Technology and they are made to look like everyday household products. They are designed specifically to go unnoticed in your kitchen, living room, bedroom and even a baby nursery.

The video surveillance industry is booming as security cameras seem to be popping up almost everywhere. U.S. sales figures for home surveillance equipment are not available, but industry analyst Joe Freeman says the numbers are higher than ever before. He estimates that major retail outlets like Lowe’s and Wal-Mart are seeing sales grow by about 50 percent each year.

It’s part of a worldwide video bonanza as more and more cameras are planted in homes, businesses and even cities and towns to help solve crimes, prevent thefts and even fight terrorism.

CLICK HERE TO TRY AND FIND THE HIDDEN CAMERAS

A person who lives in London is caught on camera an average of 300 times each day, thanks to the more that 4 million security cameras in the United Kingdom today, according to published reports. And, Forbes Magazine reports that research firm Frost & Sullivan estimates worldwide sales of spy cams will approach $100 million this year and continue to rise annually for the next few years.

When Safety Technology founder Mike Gravette began selling his hidden cameras in 2002, he knew he was onto something when, almost immediately, he could hardly keep up with the demand.

His first model was a standard-looking goose-neck desk lamp outfitted with a tiny camera inside. It became an instant hit for buyers who wanted to catch someone in the act while they weren’t home.

Gravette hired a small staff and, today, he has a catalogue of dozens of so-called “nanny cams” that can blend into any number of household surroundings — a tissue box for the living room, a hair dryer for the bathroom or perhaps a doll for a little girl’s room.

Secret Cameras Aren’t Cheap

Gravette sells his cameras to distributors around the country who then sell them at spy stores, flea markets, independent retail outlets and, of course, online. They can cost anywhere from $300 to $600 depending on whether they are wireless or have a power cord and whether they capture black and white or color video.

Among his most popular cameras are a black plastic tissue box, a small vanity mirror, a brown teddy bear and a box of Pampers baby wipes (the “natural aloe” kind) sold to nervous parents who want to keep tabs on their child’s nanny.

Each camera is outfitted with a tiny battery-operated wireless camera inside that transmits video to a VCR (or other recording device) for several hours at a time. Depending on the product they are stashed in, the battery packs are usually hidden deep down in a separate compartment, so the actual product can be placed on top. So, if the intended video target grabs a tissue, a baby wipe or a few Pringles, the package will have some of the real thing on top.

Gravette doesn’t have permission from the companies whose products he uses, but so far he’s had few problems. Only one company has complained, but Gravette says he discontinued making hidden cameras with its product immediately.

In April 2005, The Sharper Image introduced a motion-activated security camcorder hidden in a generic-looking digital clock. Its Web site boasts that the clock “lets you see What Really Happened While You Were Away!” Today, company spokesperson Tersh Barber says “it’s one of their more popular products.”

Nicole Bishop, 24, of Dallas, knows firsthand how the clock camera from The Sharper Image can bust someone in the act.

On Camera, Then Behind Bars

In the summer of 2005, Bishop had grown suspicious that someone was breaking into her one-bedroom apartment while she was at work.

For two months, she came home repeatedly to lights left on that she swore she had turned off before leaving. But, the final straw for Bishop came when a UPS package was mysteriously left on her back porch, which was accessible only from inside her apartment — Bishop decided that was enough.

Fearing that her landlord, or perhaps a maintenance man, was breaking in, Bishop went to the mall and bought the hidden clock cam and set it up facing her front door.

When Bishop returned home from work, she downloaded the images from the camera onto her computer and to her horror the camera had captured an intruder. It was not her landlord or a maintenance man.

It was Shawn Rogers, 38, who lived nearby and had taken a liking to breaking into Bishop’s apartment so he could put on her lingerie and pleasure himself while wearing it.

And it was all caught on tape thanks to Bishop’s hidden clock cam.

Rogers is now serving an eight-year sentence for his crime and Bishop is thankful she spent nearly a couple of hundred dollars. Without the videotape, there may have been little legal case against Rogers.

Laurie Levenson, a professor at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles, said hidden cameras can help put the bad guys in jail.

“Prosecutors love this. It’s a ready-made case. Here’s somebody who comes in with the tape. It shows the crime happening. There’s little the prosecutors have to do,” Levenson said. “I think more cases are being brought when there is a video. It’s an easier case for the prosecutors to bring when they have the evidence in hand.”

In addition to the types of cameras Gravette sells to his distributors, he’s also received special requests from customers who worry that introducing something new into their homes might blow their cover.

“One couple contacted us about installing a hidden camera in their son’s baseball mitt to videotape a suspicious nanny. It worked well because we were able to put a mini-DVR in the mitt so it recorded right on the DVR,” he said. Gravette wouldn’t say whether the couple caught their nanny doing anything illegal.

Gravette says that he has also installed a tiny camera in a pair of tennis shoes sent by a man who had “really smelly feet” and that one woman sent him a lamp from her living room so he could put a camera in it.

“She wanted to videotape her husband without him knowing and feared that he would catch on if something new showed up in their house,” Gravette said.

With the boom in all kinds of video surveillance equipment, Gravette says sales of his cameras have been going up consistently year after year. From 2005 to 2006, business was up 20 percent and this year he says sales are up even more.

So, bad guys take note: The next time you’re up to no good in someone’s home and you spot a can of Pringles or Slim Jims on the counter, smile, you could be on candid camera.

http://abcnews.go.com/Business/LifeStages/story?id=3676046&page=1

Mejorando la casa (TV Series 1991–1999)

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Storyline

Light television comedy about family man Tim Taylor. The show’s humor often revolves around cars, toys, tools, hardware shops, garages, fix-it-up projects, and similar themes. Written by

Tad Dibbern <DIBBERN_D@a1.mscf.upenn.edu>

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Details

Release Date: 17 September 1991 (USA)

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Also Known As: Mejorando la casa

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Company Credits

Technical Specs

Runtime:

22 min

(204 episodes)

Aspect Ratio: 1.33 : 1

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Did You Know?

Trivia

Although Mark’s middle name isn’t mentioned directly during the series, in one post-finale interview Tim said Mark’s middle name was Jason. See more »

Goofs

In the episode, ‘Karate Kid’, Wilson says that he wrote the book ‘The Psychophysiological Indices of Amorous Connections Among Termites of the Southwest’. In the episode ‘Wilson’s Girlfriend’, that book was given as the title of Jill’s psychology professor. However, in both episodes, it had only managed to sell 4 copies. See more »

Quotes

Tim:

[helping Randy with his math homework]

… now the denominator is the…

Randy:

…bottom number…

Tim:

…why don’t they just call it the bottom number? The denominator… that sounds like a Schwarzenegger movie doesn’t it?

Tim:

[impersonating Arnold Schwarzenegger]

I am the Denominator. I’ll give your leg a compound fraction.

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Crazy Credits

Most episodes featured outtakes from either Tool Time or the show itself as a backdrop to the closing credits. See more »

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The modern American family – CBS News

“We Are Family” was a hit song for Sister Sledge back in 1979. American pop music has changed a lot since then . . . and so has the American family. Our Mother’s Day Cover Story is reported by Rita Braver:

Mothers have been feeding their families Cheerios for generations. So when General Mills ran a new ad last year, it seemed like a winning formula: A timeless cereal and a universal theme: Love.

Mark Addicks, chief marketing officer at General Mills, the maker of Cheerios, immediately signed off on the ad: “We saw this as one way to tell the Cheerios story in a very new, fresh and interesting way.”

Fresh and interesting — in part, of course, because the mother is white, the father is African-American, and the little girl . . . well, she’s just adorable.

Addicks said the overwhelming response was positive, but there was also a stream of hate-filled backlash on the Internet, much of it overtly racist.

cheerios-gracie.jpg

The bi-racial family of Cheerios’ commercial, “Gracie.”

General Mills

Cheerios got so many negative comments on its website that they actually took down the comments section. “We did,” said Addicks, “because we thought there were some hurtful things, some things that weren’t positive.”

But that didn’t stop General Mills from running a follow-up ad on the biggest advertising day of all: Super Bowl Sunday.

“Did you ever think of backing down, because there was a certain segment of society that was not accepting of this?” asked Braver.

“Absolutely not,” replied Addicks. “Absolutely not.”

In 1938 General Mills commissioned Norman Rockwell to paint scenes from American family life. But households today look less and less like those images from the last century.

“The difference between family lives in 1965, let’s say, and in today is enormous,” said Johns Hopkins sociology professor Andrew Cherlin, who has been writing about the American family for more than three decades. “We have just lived through a huge period of social change. And you know what? There’s no reason to think it’s at its end. I think it’s probably still going on.”

In fact, the change is unprecedented: Marriage is at an all-time low, but for those still tying the knot, more than 15 percent of new marriages are interracial or interethnic.

As for raising kids: One-parent homes are on the rise, and the number of same-sex couples with children — though small — is the highest ever recorded.

“In the 1950s, the message was there’s only one kind of family that’s okay,” said Cherlin. “And that’s the married family a la ‘Leave It to Beaver.'”

More than a half-century later, we have “Modern Family.”

“We’ve gone from a situation where there was only one right way to have a family — that is, get married, get married young, stay married, and have lots of kids — to diverse pathways,” said Cherlin.

Monroe Moore and his husband, Lupe Perez, have a long history together — they met 24 years ago. But they’re hardly traditional. Their Asheville, N.C., household is a true modern family.

Moore said that within the first month of meeting, they knew they wanted to have a family together. “We both come from six,” said Moore, “so family is inside of us.”

Moore and Perez, who were married in Vermont last year, still remember how excited and nervous they were when they adopted their first child in 2001:

“In walks this lady with this little bundle with a shock of black hair sticking out of it,” said Perez, “and all of the waiting and all of the jumping melted away. And there was Maria, our oldest.”

Two more children, Beatrice and Oliver, have joined the family, too.

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/the-modern-american-family/